Adventures in Gardening

As Matt worked on the shed, I worked on digging up the stones on half of our patio.  I like the stones, but the patio as-is just isn’t working so I’m going to reporpose the stones for paths and edging elsewhere.

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I’m currently about 1/3 of the way through the patio.  Looks gorgeous, huh?  We’ve got a fine crop of weeds this year. (you can also see my make-shift herb/veggie garden in the pots–tomato, basil, and mint.  It will be a good summer for caprese and mojitos…. if I can keep basil alive more than a week…)

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This isn’t going to be the final layout (there will be a fair amount of tetris-ing, I’m sure) but I wanted to get an idea of how many of the stones I would need before I start digging them into place.  I’m also planning on having some sort of ground-cover between the stones so those un-mowable patches of weeds won’t be staying.

I also have a PSA for newbie-gardeners:  know thy evil plants.

I grabbed a pretty innocuous looking weed to rip it up and immediately knew something was amiss by the stabbing pain.  Ok thorns, no biggie, right? WRONG!  The stabbing/burning continued after I let go.  Ohshit.  I ran my hand under cold water and washed it with soap to try and wash away whatever toxin was causing the burning, but no luck. I even tried hot water which is a treatment for marine stingers… doesn’t work with mid-western flora apparently. On a whim I googled “Stinging nettles” and sure enough, it looked exactly like what I had grabbed bare-handed.  Joy.  The next morning–12 hours later–my hand was still burning.  I tried hydro-cortisone and antihistamines but it still didn’t really start to subside until around 18 hours later.  For the next couple of days it still felt like I had a mostly-healed burn on my palm.

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It doesn’t look all that terrifying does it?  The barbs on the stems really just look like fuzz… until you grab them.  I was feeling kind of like a dumbass for not knowing what stinging nettles look like (#citygirl) but apparently none of my co-workers did either.  One found out about them the same way I did, but another just knew she had these killer plants in her yard (seriously, one just brushed against her arm once and started the whole burning awfulness).  My sister suggested this link for weed identification… but she also suggested having Matt do all the weed pulling and I kind of like that idea.

It doesn’t help matters that we have another plant that looks pretty similar to the nettles.

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This one?  Not a nettle.  The leaves are still jagged, but a little broader and they get bluebell-like flowers on them later in the summer.  Anyone know what they really are?  The leaves seem to wrong for bluebells…

 

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Fuzzy stem, still not a nettle.  These guys get brown-eyed susan like flowers on them, but they’re way taller (about 4+ feet at their peak) and spindly-er than the brown-eyed susans I’m used to.

 

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These guys just flowered.  The flowers are more purple than they look here and I think they’re adorable… I just have no clue what they are.

 

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And my final mystery plant… I don’t remember these flowering last summer (but we didn’t move in until July).  It’s currently about 2 feet tall and too well-placed for me to just write off as a weed.

For those of you playing along at home, any ideas on my mystery plants?  The first 2 have just about taken over our back yard so they clearly spread like mad.

Demo Day on the Shed

Goodbye sad little shed, we will not miss you. Especially since you were a beast to take down.

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It may not have looked like much, but this thing was surprisingly solid.  We started by detaching it from our fence so that wouldn’t get pulled down with it.  Then Matt went it and unscrewed everything he could and then took a crowbar to the roof.

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An hour later he had the roof off, but it was ungodly heavy.

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“Real men work in khakis.” –Matt  Also, this was just 2 weekends ago and we really did need jackets.  Yay for early May in Minnesota.  At least it wasn’t snowing….

Before we could do anything else we stripped off all the shingles–they weighed a ton!  Then we were able to wrestle the roof away from where it fell so Matt could work on breaking it down into manageable chunks.

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After lunch we tackled the walls.  Some of the plywood panels pried off relatively easier than others….

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After about 3 hours of work the whole thing was down.  The shed was really assembled in the most mind-boggling way–nails, screws, bolts, staples… they used every kind of fastener known to man.  Plus, every one of the 4×4’s supporting the corners was made up of multiple pieces sistered together.  3 were 2 separate pieces, and one was made up of 3 different pieces cobbled together.

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WTF?

It still doesn’t look like much, but I think it looks better.  It’s one of the sunnier parts of our backyard so may be a possible spot for our future vegetable garden.

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Before: The Yard

I LOVE our yard, not for what it is at the moment, but for it’s potential.  It’s small, private, and well shaded.  I think it’s the perfect size to give us some space to garden and entertain without being a giant time suck.  Plus there’s a nice playground about 2 blocks away (and 2 more within a 5 minute drive) so it gives visiting nieces and nephews (and hypothetical future children) a place to get their ya-yas out without us having to deal with the maintenance.  Win.

Currently though, the yard is a little sad.

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We have about zero curb appeal… but a lot of that comes from the poo-brown color of our house.  As much as I hate the color, we don’t want to invest in painting/re-siding until it’s actually needed because it gets pretty pricey for a 2.5 story house (and the paint is currently in fine shape).  Until then I do still want to beef up the landscaping.  I’m picturing hydrangeas on the sunny side, and a sprawling shade garden under the larger pine.

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Around the side  we’ve got some annoying slopeage happening that’s kind of PITA to mow.  Matt’s big goal for the year is to build a wall.  A small wall.  A small retaining wall.  We just want to even up the front yard and side yard a bit for a cleaner look and easier maintenance.

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And then there’s the backyard.  I love how private and shady it is, but other than that it doesn’t have a lot going for it (expect potential).

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The existing beds are pretty ramshackle and weedy, there’s a weird garden right smack in the middle that seems like a waste of space, and the patio is pretty beat up and mis-matched.

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On the other side we have this weird shed (lean-to?) thing that serves no purpose whatsoever for us (expect for looking ugly).  It needs to go.  The fence on this side does need to get replaced, but it might not be a this-year thing.

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Fixing the door is a slightly higher priority since it should be a pretty cheap and easy fix that will help things look  a little less janky.  The stone-rimmed bed over here is a new addition.  It’s going to be my pollinator garden.  I split up an existing sedum from the middle our yard, and picked up some blazing star bulbs and a pollinator seed mix to fill in (you can see all the green where they’re just starting to sprout).

The main plan for this year is demo so it will all probably look a lot worse before it will get better.  The shed needs to go, the existing patio needs to be ripped up, and the cellar entrance to our basement filled in.  Some plants I want to relocate and others may be ruthlessly ripped up.  The front yard also needs some regrading to happen so our front yard may be mostly dirt for a while.

Friday Favs: Secret Gardens

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We’re going to be working on a couple different projects over the next few months–yard Before pics coming soon!–so I figured some outdoor corners would be nice springtime inspiration for all of us!

 

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Via Better Homes & Gardens

Not gonna lie, but I’m really not a fan of grass. It’s kind of boring and you just have to mow it constantly.  A little bit of river rock filler though?  Nicely textural and will really make the plants pop around it.  Plus I dig the ever-so-slightly overgrown look this little corner is sporting.

 

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Via Sugar and Cloth

Gravel can also make for a cute patio area.  I love how they paired it with pavers here to make a more stable area for the table and chairs.  Also, did you notice the A/C unit?  I barely did.

 

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Via Door Sixteen

Pavers, wood decking, mulch, AND gravel?  Whoa!  I love the mix though… as you may have caught on I think texture is a huge part of landscaping and this setting seems delightfully low maintenance.

 

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Via Holi Coffee

I’m also a sucker for ponds, but I’ll never talk Matt into one in the mosquito haven that is Minnesota.  Maybe a nice little bubbling fountain to kill the standing water….

 

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Via Fine Gardening

Or maybe a dry creek bed?  I love the look of these and they can help out with drainage in problem areas.

 

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Via Shedworking

Perhaps you’ve heard of the new(ish) fad that is the She Shed?  This kind of makes me want one….  Plus, I LOVE the look of ivy, but I know it’s terrible for homes.  I might sacrifice a small shed to it though.

 

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Via Apartment Therapy

If you want another way to get your low maintenance (after it’s done anyway) texture groove on, how about an rock rug? I don’t think I’d have the patience to make one, but they are pretty swoon-worthy.